Coloring Book

cutsceneaddict:

image

Sooner or later, your character is going to get mad. And I don’t mean “mad dog” mad, I mean steam-out-the-nostrils mad. Because anger is such a human emotion, it’s important to be able to portray an angry character without resorting to melodrama. Finding that realistic,…

theticklishpear:

This is meant as an information resource for creative folk, not a complete guide. Be sure to supplement this with additional research. Find the rest of the series, including the previous posts on clergy, nobility, divination, spirit animals, mythical…

au8:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

I swear people who follow listoflifehacks will be the most prepared for a zombie apocalypse

kekai-k:

The Knights 2 (complete)

Would a city over the ocean be plausible? It would be completely surrounded by water, land would be days away, it would not be built on an island, and it would have to be big enough to hold thousands of people.
Anonymous

clevergirlhelps:

Yes, if you answer the following questions:

  • Where is the food coming from? The city is either growing it somewhere within the city or it’s coming in by boat from another location. Eating meat will probably be difficult, because it takes a lot of grain to raise one cow (the city might not have the acreage to support a feedlot) and because fishing in the open sea is only seasonally successful.
  • Where is the water coming from? The easiest answer is that the city has massive desalinization works somewhere on premises. Just make it clear that the citizens aren’t drinking saltwater.
  • What do they do in storms? Whether it’s a typhoon or a rough patch of wind, the city needs something to protect itself from +30 ft. seas. (At least they don’t need to worry about tsunamis.) Walls? Energy barriers? Stilts? 
  • What’s holding it up? Something needs to keep millions if not billions of tons of city above the water. Since you said it’s not on an island, it needs to be something manmade. If so, perhaps there are complications associated with the support. Maybe the system can only support X weight, so civilians are only allowed to weigh X, have X lbs. of things, etc.
  • Where is the power coming from? The power to keep shields working, the power to keep lights on, etc. Hydropower, wind power, and solar power would probably work best, but if you wanted to ship billions of gallons of gasoline out to the city, you could do that.
  • How has the culture adapted to living at sea? You can’t just plop a city in the middle of the ocean and expect it to look like every other city. The city’s isolation may give rise to strange behaviors, trends, and ideologies. The city’s location on the sea could make land commodities like flowers and animals special/expensive. The industry in the city could give rise to a different ruling elite.
  • Here is my general post on making a city
Could you explain the moral alignment types? I've never really understood them, such as Lawful Evil or Chaotic Good. I would love some help on this, really like ur blog btw

clevergirlhelps:

Lawful Types

  • Lawful Good: The law is good and you do good by upholding the law. The most righteous alignment. They are morally good and they follow the laws set forth by a good institution. Ex: Captain America
  • Lawful Neutral: The law is hard, but it is the law. You are only good if you follow the rules. Order is more important than good or evil. Lawful Neutrals may be reluctant to question the status quo. Ex: Inspector Javert.
  • Lawful Evil: When evil is the law. This alignment is fairly good at organization and keeping people in line, often because this system is easier to exploit. The most reasonable type of evil, but only because they’re planning your takedown at the same time. Ex: Professor Umbridge.

Chaotic Types

  • Chaotic Good: Sometimes, conventions like the law and rules get in the way of doing good. To these guys, it’s more important to do what you think is good than to toe the line. Often found in opposition to authority, especially authority they perceive as unjust. Ex: Tony Stark
  • Chaotic Neutral: Do what you want and ignore anyone who disagrees with you. Their desires are above laws and morality. They value their independence and freedom of choice over anything else. Ex: Captain Jack Sparrow
  • Chaotic Evil: Do what you want and kill anyone who disagrees with you. They also want freedom, but at the torturous expense of others/the law. Chaotic Evil doesn’t necessarily shoot up a bus Because, but maybe if they’ve had a bad day or someone special is on it. Ex: the Joker

Neutral Types

  • Neutral Good: Do unto others as you would have done unto you. Neutral Good characters are only interested in doing good. They often follow the law, but don’t wholeheartedly believe in it. They won’t force other people to be good. Ex: John Watson
  • Neutral Neutral/Neutral: Who cares? Neutrals just want to live their lives without interference or they want to keep a kind of balance between two opposing forces. Likely to view politics and ideals as stupid and divisive. Ex: Tyrion Lannister
  • Neutral Evil: Self > Others. They value their own life and gain before anyone and anything else. They may ally with Good for said gain, although their primarily selfish and often harmful actions place them squarely in Evil. Called the Douchebag Alignment. Ex: Smaug

amandaonwriting:

If you are writing for fun, and if you don’t want any help, please write any way that works for you. I am not trying to convert you to writing with a plan. It truly does not matter to me how you write. However, if you are struggling to finish a book that makes sense, I would love you to carry on reading.

Why should you do it?

When I used to teach Writers Write regularly, one of the first things I asked students was: How does your story end? I did this for two reasons. Firstly, as much as some people love the idea of working with meandering storylines, it has been my experience that those writers seldom finish writing a coherent book. Secondly, most people who go to workshops or sign up for courses are truly looking for help, and I’ve learned that the best way to succeed in anything in life is to have a plan. Successful people will tell you that you need to know where you’re going before you begin.

Smell the roses

This does not mean that you can’t take time to smell the roses, or explore hidden paths along the way. It simply means that you always have a lifeline and when you get lost, it will be easier for you to find your way back again. Remember that readers like destinations. They love beginnings, middles, and endings. Why do you think fans are terrified that George R.R. Martin will die before he finishes A Song of Fire and Ice? They want to know how the story ends. 

Here are seven reasons why I suggest you write your ending first.

  1. If you know who the characters are at the end of the story, you will know how much you should reveal about them at the beginning. 
  2. You will be forced out of the ‘backstory hell’ that beginner writers inhabit and into the story the reader wants to read.
  3. Hindsight is an amazing thing. We all know how different life seems when we’re looking back. We can often tell where a problem began. We think about the ‘what ifs’ with the gift of hindsight. You can use this to your advantage in fiction writing.
  4. You will have something to work towards. Instead of aimlessly writing and hoping for the muse to show you the way, you will be able to pull the characters’ strings and write the words they need to get them from the beginning through the middle to the end.
  5. Plotting from the ending backwards saves you so much time because you will leave out stuff that isn’t meant to be there. You will not have to muddle through an overwritten first draft.
  6. Writing the end forces most of us out of our comfort zones. We have to confront the reality of what we are doing. It might not be as romantic as flailing around like a helpless maiden, but if you want writing to be your profession, it’s good to make the outcome visible. This is a way to show yourself that you are serious. The end gives you a goal to work towards.
  7. The ending is as important as the beginning. Good beginnings get people to read your first book. Great endings get readers to buy your second book.

There are a handful of famous authors, like Stephen King and George R.R. Martin, who say they don’t plot. I think they just don’t realise they are those rare authors – natural born storytellers, and that plotting is instinctive for them. I have interviewed many successfully published authors and I can revel that the majority of them do believe in plotting. They outline, in varying degrees, before they begin. And yes, most of them know what their ending will be. Why don’t you try it? What have you got to lose?

I truly hope this helps you write, and finish, your book.

by Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy 10 (Amazingly Simple) Tips to Get You Back on The Writing Track and The Author’s Promise- two things every writer should do. You could also read The Top 10 Tips for Plotting and Finishing a Book.

sombreroh:

why should you make a webcomic?

  1. it’s regular drawing practice
  2. you get to draw and develop the universe your OCs live in
  3. you could draw your OCs making out with context
  4. see number 3

how can you make a webcomic?

  1. make a new tumblr
  2. install this theme…

its-tuesday-again:

WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH STRAIGHT BOYS

I wish this video was an exaggeration.