Coloring Book

wruzicka-reblogs:

as-warm-as-choco:

plagueofgripes:

vmagazine:

'Seeking Aether' (experimental garment collection): InAisce FW 13/14 Men's Collection featuring South Sudanese refugee and former child soldier turned actor and model Ger Duany  - video link

Ger Duany, you are amazing, sir. #7 is some kind of amazing villain waiting to be born.

WTF with people rocking this kind of clothing seriously. I’m pointing at you too nefowlsSome of these coats are so good. And his boots are like heaven.

Third one… Assassins Creed set in future instead of past.

viahelps:

Godchecker.com

writingwithcolor:

writeworld:

We have more Gods and Goddesses than you can shake a stick at.

Our Mythology Encyclopedia features over 3,700 weird and wonderful Supreme Beings, Demons, Spirits and Fabulous Beasts from all over the world….

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?
NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.
If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.
There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:
Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.
FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO
Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.
PLANNING AND PREPARATION 
If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:
My Outlining and Planning Guide
Name Generators for People, Places, and Things 
Naming Characters 
Titles 
World Building 
Prepping For NaNoWriMo: The Outlining Stage
Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:
My Preparation Advice
Kris Noel’s Preparation Advice
Create Your Own Writer’s Retreat
Book Geek Confessions’ Prep Advice
WRITING
One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.
Getting Started
Motivation 
Writing the Beginning 
Writing the Middle 
Writing the End
The Elephant Technique (for when you’re stuck with naming or describing something)
Finishing Your Story
Inspiration
Writing Playlists and Music
Writer’s Block
Writing Software and Websites
OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS
10 NaNoWriMo Tips
20 Things You Should Know About NaNo
NaNo Tips
NaNoWriMo is Coming
Writer’s Digest NaNoWriMo Tips
Checklist for Nano
Lots of NaNo Tips
Word Count Widgets If You Don’t Like the NaNo Ones
AFTER NANO ENDS
So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:
Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.
For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

thewritingcafe:

WHAT IS NANOWRIMO?

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It begins on November 1st of every year and goes until 11:59 on November 30th. During this time, participants must write a novel that is at least 50,000 words.

If you win NaNoWriMo, you get some perks that are listed on the website each year. Examples include discounts on writing software, free downloads, and some free physical copies of your self published book.

There is also a related event called Camp NaNoWriMo. This is the same as NaNoWriMo, but with a few differences:

  • Camp NaNoWriMo takes place in April and July.
  • On the Camp NaNoWriMo website, you can be in “cabins" with other writers where you can chat and encourage each other to write.
  • You can set your own word count goal for Camp NaNoWriMo.

FAQ ABOUT NANOWRIMO

Do I have to write a novel? Can I write an anthology of short stories?

While the original premise was to write a novel, you are free to write an anthology or short stories (or something similar) if you wish.

Does it have to be original fiction? Can I write fan fiction?

Again, the original premise was to write original fiction, but you can write fan fiction if you want.

Am I allowed to plan my story before November?

Yes! Writers are encouraged to prepare prior to NaNoWriMo.

Am I allowed to start writing my story before NaNoWriMo as long as I write an additional 50k words during November?

You’re supposed to start with a new story, but there’s no one to stop you from continuing an old story or even rewriting one.

Does my novel have to be 50,000 words, or can I go over?

You can definitely go over the word count.

Make sure to check the nanowrimo website for more FAQs.

PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

If you’re prone to writer’s block, I highly recommend that you plan before you write:

Otherwise, prepare mentally and physically for the challenge of writing a novel in a month. Plan out when you will write each day and for how long. Remember, you need at least 1667 words per day to reach the goal by the end of the month. Find a nice spot to write, have all your notes in order, and back up all your files. Here are some more tips and resources:

WRITING

One thing you need to avoid during NaNoWriMo is editing. If you edit while you’re trying to write, your writing will be slowed and you’ll fall behind. Just keep writing.

OTHER NANOWRIMO TIPS

AFTER NANO ENDS

So NaNoWriMo is over (or you’ve finished your novel) and now you have a rough draft of your manuscript. Here are some tips:

  • Do not immediately send it to an agent or publisher. Tons of people start sending out their manuscripts right after NaNoWriMo and it’s a huge mistake because they’re not sending polished, ready-to-be-published manuscripts. They’re sending rough drafts they wrote quickly.
  • Leave it alone before you start editing. Walk away from your manuscript and work on something else or take a break from writing. This break could be a few days, a few weeks, or even a few months. It depends on you. Then start editing once you’re fresh again.

For more on editing and publishing, see my How to Write and Publish a Novel page.

theticklishpear:

This list is meant as an information resource for creative folk, not a complete guide. Be sure to supplement this with additional research. Find the rest of the series, including the previous posts on clergy, nobility, divination, and medieval…

thewritingcafe:

A list of occupations and titles found in a medieval city.

You can find similar information here:

I constantly hear that characters come alive when you're writing, and that they are the ones who end up taking the lead of the story and most of the times you don't realize that they're taking you where THEY want. But... that doesn't happen to me? And I'm kinda worried because I don't experience that, and it's supposed to be something great because it means they're well developed and such. I don't know, any advice? (thank you)

maxkirin:

Hello there, writerly friend~ ♥︎

I know where you are coming from. Right now, before the story even begins— I can feel this certain pull when I think about my characters. it’s a strange sense of certainty, like the light of a torch inside of a dark tunnel. I don’t know where i am going, but I trust that the characters will take me there… and they always do.

The thing is, I didn’t start like this.

Back when I first started writing, I used to roll my eyes at the writers who claimed that they had no control over the story.

"Of course you have control! You are the one writing the story, just change what they say," Young Max said, rolling his eyes so hard they nearly fell out of their sockets.

It took me a while to understand that, (first off) all writers are different, but also that there seemed to be this unspoken truth that most writers had no control. It took me a long while to understand that. I used to plot like crazy. I used to think that I was the movie director, telling the actors what to do and shouting ‘CUT!’ when they screwed up a line.

Over time, though, I realized that I was not the director… but merely the camera-man. I am not calling the shots, I just show up every day at the same time, and the actors follow up on the script given to them by someone I have never met. Sure, sometimes I get a feeling for where things are going— but at the end of the day I am just the guy with the camera.

Now, I know what you must be thinking:

"Great, Max is going to tell me that I have to write, and practice, and wait until I am good enough to be able to ‘feel’ that pull or whatever he talked about,” said the Strawman, throwing his arms in the air like he truly did not care.

Nope. Although I think time and practice played a great part in this— I can tell you that the most important factor in learning to trust my characters was to…

It’s time for my catchphrase, everybody, at the count of 1-2-3:

GET OUT OF THE WAY OF THE STORY.

Seriously. The most important lesson is to learn to step aside and let the story go. You are the person with the camera. Your job is to record what is going on. Nothing else. Nothing more. You want your characters to shine? You want your characters to grow before your eyes? Get out of the way of the story. I want you to picture a movie set where the camera-man started yelling at the actors:

  • "I am just not sure if anyone is going to take this story seriously."
  • "I feel like this story has been told before."
  • "I worry what people will think of me if they read this story."

I don’t know about you, but I would get a little fed up if my camera-man kept interrupting me in the middle of a scene.

Here’s what I want you to do, okay? I want you to keep writing. I want you to step aside and write. Go with the flow. Learn to trust your characters. You want them to behave like people? Then treat them like people. Simple as that c;

I hope this helps! If you, or any other writerly friends, have any questions, then make sure to send them my way.

Keep writing, writerly friend~ ♥︎

ryenross:

me: hey i’m kinda good at this writing thing
*reads other people’s writing*
me: i am a literary potato

wobbufetts:

aidn:

how the hell do i talk to people

Stand in front of them and press A

How do I explain something scientifically? (I write sci-fi but I'm having trouble with a work in which Venus is now terraformed) I would like to make it hard sci-fi but I can't make something belivable. Also, how do I make something (speaking about future) to look normal or common? Thanks.
Anonymous

characterandwritinghelp:

Making something look normal or common is less about terminology or how you initially describe it and more about how you include it. If you want hover vehicles to be seen as a normal part of the world, show them in everyday situations: kids on their way to school who are racing each other on hoverboards, a hover-scooter lying on someone’s lawn while it recharges on a faded cord, special parking for hovercars built into the parking lots alongside bike racks/”normal” car spaces/etc. Only give it enough special treatment in description to make sure the audience knows what it is. Once it has been established, use it as a facet of the world rather than the center of attention. It’s a normal part of the world and does not get special attention anymore (or ever, depending on how you handle exposition).

As far as describing things, I have some links I think you will like:

-Headless

Hello! So I am absolutely terrible at arguing, but my OC is not supposed to be. He is way more persuasive and clever than I am, and he can easily win a debate, so how can I RP someone who is far above my level? I'm afraid of writing weak arguments that will make him look stupid.
Anonymous

It’s actually really easy to be good at arguments and debates, especially if you’re in an rp setting and can make shit up. :D Here are some personal tips from me on how to construct an argument. Remember the PEA! Point, evidence, analysis. Before constructing any argument, try to know what your point is. Try to write a topic sentence, as concise as possible, like “The Avengers will kick the X-Men ass in a battle located in New York City”. Evidence! Try to have at least three pieces of evidence possible in order to back up your point, and always analyze this evidence afterwards. “Because The Avengers have Captain America” Evidence! “Who really has a nice ass and no one can beat his ass cause he has the best one, duh!” Analysis! “Because Wolverine will totally help the Avengers. As seen in graphic novel blah blah blah, Wolverine’s loyalty lies with the Avengers and not with the X-Men.” That’s basically how I would do it in any sort of essay writing slash pseudo debate scenario. 

Here are some links to help you with constructing arguments:

Depending on how you want to play your character, there are a lot of ways to be persuasive. Your character can be more intellectual, coming up with good points to persuade someone to do good. Or, your character can be cunning and achieve it through subtle psychological hints and body language. For example, if you’re drinking with someone, every time that person laugh, by taking a drink you can make them associate the happy and free feeling of being drunk with you. So they naturally listen to you more. Obviously, that’s really sneaky, so it’s up to your character traits on whether that would be included. All persuasive characters have one thing in common and that’s confidence. So as the writer, you have to be confident in what your character’s motivations are. Be sure that you know why your character is persuading someone to do as such. Is it because they always want to be right? Or, is it because they are more manipulative?

Here are some links to help:

And for playing someone more clever than you are, google helps. Really. I’m currently playing an electrical engineer and I have no idea how to even begin. But it’s always about the research. When a specific topic comes up like, building a tiny robot camera, I google how to build a robot camera. It’s legitimately all I do for every character. When I roleplay Hawkeye, I think I had thirty tabs open at one point telling me how to shoot an arrow and how to calculate wind direction affecting said arrow. So you know, bullshit a little bit, and google a little bit. Throw really long words at your roleplayer and it’s all good. 

Here are some links:

Hope that helps!